MAXX Potential

AI Is Taking Over Resume Assessment. Is That A Good Thing?

By Barbara Brutt

Men At Interview With AI Robot Machine

The benefits of Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology are here to stay, and it’s already automating many processes, including hiring. Charged with automation of repetitive tasks, AI frees humans for other creative problem-solving challenges—specifically, the ability to produce new ways to do things. When it comes to resume assessment, AI handles collection and resume analysis while managers run the interview process.

The purpose of the resume is to get a candidate’s foot in the door for the hiring process. When a hiring manager or an AI software program looks at a resume, they’re seeking specific skills and experience. So what does it take to assess a resume and the corresponding candidate?

What It Takes to Assess a Resume

Most industries require a resume for an initial job application, and these documents are basically a sparknotes version of a candidate’s work history and experience. When looking at a resume, it’s important to compare the job description to the work experience. If the role requires interpersonal skills or daily writing responsibilities, it’s ideal to look for customer service experience and clean writing throughout the resume.

A Human Assesses a Resume

When a Human Resources hiring manager handles job applications and assesses resumes, they compare job experience to the role description. They look at job history, projects, and results. Hit the right style points, and some managers will likely be swayed to interview. Hide your contact information in an excessive design, and you may never hear back.

The human element of resume assessment may include unconscious biases, gut instincts, and certain familiarities. This can make some resumes move to the top of the pile while other candidates who might be great for the role are overlooked.

While a resume presents job facts, it also shares a story of personal and professional growth. A hiring manager can see the candidate’s career passion, sense of authenticity, and personal pride. These clues converge to represent a candidate’s potential.

AI Assesses a Resume

AI replacing humans has made the resume assessment process more efficient. Collecting resumes through an automated application system allows for notifications of resume receipt to be sent to employer and candidate alike. These are welcome benefits.

When an AI program assesses a resume, its algorithms follow exact rules. AI searches for keywords from the job description in the resume, and it assesses whether or not the appropriate certifications, education levels, and work timelines are present. For AI, the process is a simple yes or no. If a resume meets the criteria, then the corresponding candidate moves forward in the hiring process.

As AI becomes more pervasive, many people fear being replaced by artificial intelligence. However, according to census data studies collected over the last 140 years, automation technology has actually created more jobs.

The Problem with AI Resume Assessment

Where AI falls short in recruiting is how it evaluates candidates based on historical data as opposed to their current potential. AI vetoes resumes of candidates who may have the necessary skills and aptitude for a role, but they lack the education levels or general certifications.

AI was not designed to increase the diversity in hiring. It was designed to make administrative processes more efficient for employers. It did one job, but it cannot do the other. There are many people capable of filling the positions that cause recruiting headaches for tech employers, but they won’t all shine in historical evaluation systems. 

In the United States, there are an estimated 27 million “hidden workers,” people who want to work but are failing the initial resume assessment because they’re lacking credentials. AI resume assessment misses the candidate’s potential and value beyond credentials.

According to the Harvard Business School, hidden workers cited the following criteria that disqualified them from securing work:

  • 36% – years of experience
  • 30% – employment gaps in resume
  • 29% – academic performance
  • 29% – professional credentials
  • 26% – career progression (previous job titles and employers)
  • 22% – skills

A large majority (88%) of employers agree that qualified high-skill candidates are vetted out of the process because they do not match the exact criteria established by the job description. That number rose to 94% in the case of middle-skill workers.

AI algorithms are designed to isolate criteria on an applicant’s resume and sort resumes by that information, but the algorithms may skip a creatively-skilled applicant’s resume who may become an impactful employee.

Knowing how to spot potential is crucial and it’s what MAXX Potential does.

Assessing Potential Beyond the Resume

Recognizing potential in a resume starts with reading between the lines of the project accomplishments, interpersonal achievements, and passion presentation. While AI checkmarks credentials, industry keywords, and education, hiring managers unearth a candidate’s attitude, drive, and eagerness.

At MAXX Potential, we look for the people who light up—who revel in the journey of solving a problem.

We find talented individuals because they are interested in joining the tech industry and sign up for the free multi-session Career Lab. Participants interact with hands-on activities, demonstrating problem-solving abilities alongside their tech experience. After Career Lab, some participants apply to the paid apprenticeship program where they gain on-the-job experience and professional development mentorship.

There is no shortage of high potential people—the key is finding them and equipping them to succeed in the tech industry.

Ready to learn more about the tech industry or ready to find a unique way to invest in future tech talent? Register for our next Career Lab as a participant or partner with MAXX Potential to access a diverse talent pipeline.

MORE POSTS

AI Is Taking Over Resume Assessment. Is That A Good Thing?

By Barbara Brutt

Men At Interview With AI Robot Machine

The benefits of Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology are here to stay, and it’s already automating many processes, including hiring. Charged with automation of repetitive tasks, AI frees humans for other creative problem-solving challenges—specifically, the ability to produce new ways to do things. When it comes to resume assessment, AI handles collection and resume analysis while managers run the interview process.

The purpose of the resume is to get a candidate’s foot in the door for the hiring process. When a hiring manager or an AI software program looks at a resume, they’re seeking specific skills and experience. So what does it take to assess a resume and the corresponding candidate?

What It Takes to Assess a Resume

Most industries require a resume for an initial job application, and these documents are basically a sparknotes version of a candidate’s work history and experience. When looking at a resume, it’s important to compare the job description to the work experience. If the role requires interpersonal skills or daily writing responsibilities, it’s ideal to look for customer service experience and clean writing throughout the resume.

A Human Assesses a Resume

When a Human Resources hiring manager handles job applications and assesses resumes, they compare job experience to the role description. They look at job history, projects, and results. Hit the right style points, and some managers will likely be swayed to interview. Hide your contact information in an excessive design, and you may never hear back.

The human element of resume assessment may include unconscious biases, gut instincts, and certain familiarities. This can make some resumes move to the top of the pile while other candidates who might be great for the role are overlooked.

While a resume presents job facts, it also shares a story of personal and professional growth. A hiring manager can see the candidate’s career passion, sense of authenticity, and personal pride. These clues converge to represent a candidate’s potential.

AI Assesses a Resume

AI replacing humans has made the resume assessment process more efficient. Collecting resumes through an automated application system allows for notifications of resume receipt to be sent to employer and candidate alike. These are welcome benefits.

When an AI program assesses a resume, its algorithms follow exact rules. AI searches for keywords from the job description in the resume, and it assesses whether or not the appropriate certifications, education levels, and work timelines are present. For AI, the process is a simple yes or no. If a resume meets the criteria, then the corresponding candidate moves forward in the hiring process.

As AI becomes more pervasive, many people fear being replaced by artificial intelligence. However, according to census data studies collected over the last 140 years, automation technology has actually created more jobs.

The Problem with AI Resume Assessment

Where AI falls short in recruiting is how it evaluates candidates based on historical data as opposed to their current potential. AI vetoes resumes of candidates who may have the necessary skills and aptitude for a role, but they lack the education levels or general certifications.

AI was not designed to increase the diversity in hiring. It was designed to make administrative processes more efficient for employers. It did one job, but it cannot do the other. There are many people capable of filling the positions that cause recruiting headaches for tech employers, but they won’t all shine in historical evaluation systems. 

In the United States, there are an estimated 27 million “hidden workers,” people who want to work but are failing the initial resume assessment because they’re lacking credentials. AI resume assessment misses the candidate’s potential and value beyond credentials.

According to the Harvard Business School, hidden workers cited the following criteria that disqualified them from securing work:

  • 36% – years of experience
  • 30% – employment gaps in resume
  • 29% – academic performance
  • 29% – professional credentials
  • 26% – career progression (previous job titles and employers)
  • 22% – skills

A large majority (88%) of employers agree that qualified high-skill candidates are vetted out of the process because they do not match the exact criteria established by the job description. That number rose to 94% in the case of middle-skill workers.

AI algorithms are designed to isolate criteria on an applicant’s resume and sort resumes by that information, but the algorithms may skip a creatively-skilled applicant’s resume who may become an impactful employee.

Knowing how to spot potential is crucial and it’s what MAXX Potential does.

Assessing Potential Beyond the Resume

Recognizing potential in a resume starts with reading between the lines of the project accomplishments, interpersonal achievements, and passion presentation. While AI checkmarks credentials, industry keywords, and education, hiring managers unearth a candidate’s attitude, drive, and eagerness.

At MAXX Potential, we look for the people who light up—who revel in the journey of solving a problem.

We find talented individuals because they are interested in joining the tech industry and sign up for the free multi-session Career Lab. Participants interact with hands-on activities, demonstrating problem-solving abilities alongside their tech experience. After Career Lab, some participants apply to the paid apprenticeship program where they gain on-the-job experience and professional development mentorship.

There is no shortage of high potential people—the key is finding them and equipping them to succeed in the tech industry.

Ready to learn more about the tech industry or ready to find a unique way to invest in future tech talent? Register for our next Career Lab as a participant or partner with MAXX Potential to access a diverse talent pipeline.

MORE POSTS